Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Last Stand on Zombie Island by Christopher Eger





WELCOME TO THE END OF THE WORLD!

Disease-K has decimated the world leaving its victims shambling homicidal maniacs. And nestled along the warm Gulf waters sits Gulf Shores…the last outpost of civilization. With looters and thieves preying on the shocked survivors, it’s up to the retirees and bank tellers, phone repairmen and charterboat captains to put the town back together.

THE SHADOWS ARE GATHERING OUTSIDE OF TOWN!

There, in the sands and marshes of the Gulf of Mexico, the citizens of Gulf Shores along with scattered military units, a downed Air Force pilot, and a lone Coast Guard cutter form the last line of defense against the amassing horde of the infected marching its way toward the sea destroying what is left of humanity along the way.
As summer gives way to the fall and the cold winds blow off the sea, Gulf Shores draws the line and prepares to make the…

THE LAST STAND ON ZOMBIE ISLAND!

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           Billy walked along the bulkhead that kept his back yard from falling into Mobile Bay with two old five-gallon pickle buckets in each hand. These days, pickle buckets were becoming the all-purpose survival tool along the island. Between carrying water from working wells and faucets, to bathing, holding waste when plumbing had backed up, clothes washing and a dozen other tasks, they were indispensable. Even with the electricity flowing to the island from the offshore windmill, it was enough only to power part of the city itself, with none remaining for the 26-miles of lines outside of town.
One of Billy’s buckets was full, the other empty. The full one was the day’s laundry soaking. The empty one was for dinner.
He set down the full bucket to warm in the sun along the bulkhead and continued alone down its length. Facing the calm Mobile Bay, his backyard had a view across the still water for miles.
Sea smoke, the mist rising from the water because of the different temperatures of water and air, hung low over the bay. The mist settled on the water and obscured anything more than a mile off. For the whole time he had been there, he had rarely looked out over the Bay and not seen a boat. Now it was rare to see anything but the occasional seabird or rolling porpoise fin chasing baitfish in the shallows.  All of the normal sounds that you take for granted, air conditioners, cars, etc. were suddenly gone. He did not mind the change too much, he had to admit.
As he walked, he reached down to the edge of the bulkhead and retrieved a blue nylon boat line from the water, letting it run through his hand as he moved. Every fifteen feet his hand caught a lead tied to the line that held a shower curtain ring with the head of a decapitated mullet impaled through the eye socket. Invariably each fish head would have a blue crab holding onto it for dear life. Too selfish to turn the head loose to save their own life, the crabs held on with their claws until Billy shook them into the bucket and threw the lead with the fish head still attached back into the Bay.
Cast netting for mullet for yesterday’s dinner left him a pile of mullet heads, so he found a use for them. He had learned the trick as kid growing up in Pascagoula, selling the crabs to Bozo’s Seafood for a half-dollar a pop. After the end of his 400-feet of rope and the 25 leads that ran off it, he had 20 nice, fat crabs skittering around in the bottom of the half-full bucket.
The searchlight from the Coast Guard cutter a few hundred yards away sliced through the sea smoke and hit Billy’s eyes. To make no mistake that they were there, the foghorn sounded briefly, scattering a flock of terns parked in the high grass around the bulkhead.
“Dad, they are here,” Cat called from the back porch.
“Yeah, I guess today they are the Crab Cops.”
Billy sighed and picked up the bucket of crabs before walking back towards the house as slow as he could. Standing there on the porch was his daughter in a ratty pair of blue jeans and an old sweatshirt. Her hair was…crazy.
He passed her the bucket to which she only glanced in and rolled her eyes. “Hey, listen. I just wanted to tell you…”
Cat looked at him and her eyes welled up. She nodded her head. “I know,” she said as she hugged him.
“Where is your brother? He still asleep?” Billy asked as he wiped his fishy hands on a towel.
“He’s asleep on the couch. They got the blimp off this morning and he came back home and passed out,” she said and only just briefly hesitated before she asked, “Do we have to go to school today?”
Billy laughed as he walked with her through the house. “No, I guess not, but definitely tomorrow. And don’t give Mack too much crap while I’m gone.”


 
What was one of the most surprising things you learned while writing your books?

My book takes place during and after a zombie apocalypse and I  realized, after I saw my characters walking around interacting in the book, how much everyday life has to go on. Sure you have just had your high school overrun with the undead, but after they have all been killed there still has to be a prom. Of course, all of the cops are dead, but someone has to be made to enforce law and order again. Even if you just have two people left in the world, they have to be left with a society in order to survive.

If you could apologize to someone in your past, who would it be?

I would like to go back and apologize to my grandmother. She grew up in Europe during World War 2 and had to endure not only the fighting but then a Soviet occupation. I used to think it was funny when I would look under her bed and find a shotgun, or open her linen closet and see cases of canned food hidden under towels way in the back. It’s only now, after realizing what she grew up with, that I understand she wasn’t completely eccentric.  

What is something people would be surprised to know about you?

I used to play jazz trombone in a garage Ska band. I am not sure many people in my own family even know that.

If you could select one book that you could rewrite and add your own unique twist on, which book would that be and why?

War and Peace by Tolstoy. Only I would make Napoleon’s Grand Armee a horde of shambling undead.  Now I think I can really sink my teeth into that. (And yes, I did just call dibs on the idea so don’t get any notions !)

Do you have any suggestions for beginning writers? If so, what are they?

WRITE! Even if you don’t want to, even if you are tired, even if you have nothing to write, keep making pages. Eventually they will turn into something. And once you have written something, don’t throw it away even if you don’t like it or don’t finish it. I have sold several short stories and articles that I have picked up and put down a half dozen times. Just like old bricks from a demolished building, paragraphs and concepts can be re-purposed.

Tell us about your current release

Disease-K has decimated the world leaving its victims shambling homicidal maniacs. And nestled along the warm Gulf waters sits Gulf Shores…the last outpost of civilization. With looters and thieves preying on the shocked survivors, it’s up to the retirees and bank tellers, phone repairmen and charterboat captains to put the town back together.

There, in the sands and marshes of the Gulf of Mexico, the citizens of Gulf Shores along with scattered military units, a downed Air Force pilot, and a lone Coast Guard cutter form the last line of defense against the amassing horde of the infected marching its way toward the sea destroying what is left of humanity along the way.

 Last Stand on Zombie Island is written from the perspective of several survivors of the upcoming zombie apocalypse on the geographically isolated man-made island on Gulf Shores Alabama. Billy Harris, the leather skinned recently divorced charter boat captain and single dad is, sarcastic and irreverent and thrust into an unlikely hero role. Captain Eric Stone is a battle-scarred National Guard officer forced to lead his dwindling MP Company to save his hometown. Major Sarah Reynolds, an icy cold Air Force pilot, had survived her crash landing on Gulf Shores but is just looking to get off the island for her own list of reasons. Bank teller Mackenzie Tillman is trapped at her job in the most literal meaning and has nowhere to go. Local pot merchant and seller of other people's stuff, Spud, is just trying to figure out how he can take advantage of the situation. Coast Guard patrol boat skipper Orlando Jarvis, fresh from the Academy, is struggling to make the right decisions to keep his ship safe.

The book follows our survivors’ journey as they survive the initial outbreak.

Gulf Shores Alabama
This is only the genesis of the events to occur. The survivors soon realizes that they are capable of doing anything for survival and for the protection of those they care for; even if that means delivering indescribable acts of violence. With the population of almost 2,000 shell shocked and humbled survivors huddled on an isolated Gulf Coast island, they are forced to work together or fall apart. As summer gives way to the fall and the cold winds blow off the sea, Gulf Shores draws the line and prepares to make the…last stand on Zombie Island.

Where do you research for your books?

This book was challenging. I have an extensive military and law enforcement background and am currently a firearms instructor and trainer for a Department of Homeland Security contractor, so that gave me a solid foundation for much of the technical parts of the story. However I also consulted with GPS experts for questions about how GPS would work post-ZPOC, took a cruise on a Coast Guard Cutter to see how they operate, hung out with Emergency management people and other such hands-on tasks that helped me understand what I was writing. Plus I watched a lot of zombie movies, ha-ha.


Christopher L Eger is a firearms instructor and security consultant to a federal government force protection contractor. He formerly worked in law enforcement and was a trainer for a fortune 100 telecommunications company among other journeys in life. Christopher has been writing nonfiction since 2005 and is a writer for Mississippi Sportsman magazine, Warship International and Eye Spy Intelligence Magazine with some 300 articles in print on military history, offshore game fishing, and naval events. While he has had several short stories published, Last Stand on Zombie Island is his first novel. You can follow him at his blog at: www.laststandonzombieisland.com



Enter to win a signed Print copy of Last Stand on Zombie Island
Open to US Addresses only
Comment on this post for a bonus entry.
Giveaway Ends August 25th 11:59PM Central Time.


17 comments:

ronnkelly3 said...

Thank you so much for the giveaway..
The book looks great..

Kristin@BloodSweatandBooks said...

I love Zombies (ok well a bit obsessed) and this book totally is something I'd love. Having read so many in the genre I am always on the hunt for the next great zombie read! Thank you for the opportunity to win a copy.

laura thomas said...

Oh I hope I win. I live on the Gulf Coast of Alabama and would love to read this book. Maybe I'll read about places I know, like the island:) Of course, it helps that there are zombies. One of my favorite genres to read and review. Crossing fingers, toes and eyes!

Wendy said...

I really enjoyed reading the author's comments.

Autumn said...

The cover looks AMAZING! And with a cover like that it just makes me want to read the book. :D The interview was a great read. Thanks for the giveaway.

Diana Stanhope said...

Thanks for the great giveaway! I am admittedly a zombie fanatic!

M.A.D. said...

I love reading good zombie stories and this one hooked me right away!! :D

Plus that cover ROCKS!

Thank you for the sweet giveaway <3
Mary DeBorde M.A.D.

Goldenmane said...

The zombies add a wonderful twist to the question of survival when something apocalyptic happens. This is something we all must think about with global warming, peculiar weather, crop disasters and, of course, the Mayan prophecy. I'm not convinced that disaster will strike on 12/21/2012, but I do think that something unpleasant will creep up on us soon and at that time it won't be money, but basic skills, necessary commodities and mutual co-operation will winnow out those who survive from those who don't. Those whose only assets are money-oriented and who have always paid to have things done for them will not be capable of survival unless they can learn some skill that they can contribute to the well-being of the community.

LesleyfromWI said...

Thanks for the chance to win!

thescreamingmeme said...

i love zombie books!

Karen Arrowood said...

Zombie books are so much fun to read. This would be a great addition to the library.

Anonymous said...

not that young but still like to read and be scared..

Jennifer Paige said...

Horror stories are my favorite, especially zombie stories :)

sottovoce said...

I am always eager to read a new Zombie book...they are so much fun! :-) Thank you.
jaquerichards at yahoo dot com

daveshir2005 said...

Awesome contest! Thanks

email/ daveshir2005@yahoo.com

Trisha McKee said...

THank you for such a great giveaway!

tridingermckee at gmail dot com

/\Heather/\ said...

Terrifying! I can't wait to read it. In the daylight!